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False Real

False

Real

False

Real

 

Jincheng’s exciting new work False Real (oil and acrylic on canvas) literally rips and tears apart the canvas in a disturbingly real trompe l’œil. Searingly beautiful mask-like faces peer out of the canvas to disturb boundaries between truth and deception.

Specification

Year of Production: 2015

Place of Production: London /strong>

Size: 80 x 60 cm

Material: Oil Acrylic on canvas

Jincheng’s exciting new work False Real (oil and acrylic on canvas) literally rips and tears apart the canvas in a disturbingly real trompe l’œil. Searingly beautiful mask-like faces peer out of the canvas to disturb boundaries between truth and deception.

WHAT LIES
BENEATH?

Jincheng’s exciting new work False Real (oil and acrylic on canvas) literally rips and tears apart the canvas in a disturbingly real trompe l’œil. Searingly beautiful mask-like faces peer out of the canvas to disturb boundaries between truth and deception. What lies beneath the façade of painting and the façade of our daily lives? Folds of white paper ripped casually and strategically so that our eyes are drawn to the spaces beyond but we are given a void; death masks or Venetian masks which defy single interpretations. What skill! Series 11 takes us away from the face to the vulva. Primitive and raw, crude even, Courbet’s Origine du Monde comes to mind stripped bare of flesh, reduced to a hole and a slit. In Series 12 a hooded eye gazes languidly back at the viewer. Creases are wrinkles. Series 25 is wounded with plasters covering the gashes and Series 4 cyclopic eye is unflinching. We are being observed by these works and asked to question what is true and what is a lie.

The Chinese Lake stones called ‘Memory of Stones’ are breath-taking. Done in ink on fine cotton they are three dimensional stains onto cloth; shrouded imprints of time and memory like Christ’s face. Their memories are preserved and tell no stories yet like scholar stones in the Tang dynasty they are thin, perforated and wrinkly like the paper we saw before. They can be trusted to stay silent. Fossil- like, their disintegration by natural elements, gives us patterns of geological depth. We plunder the earth beneath them imagining what once they might have been. We find shapes in their abstraction, animals, mountains, and a landscape as big as China itself, yet often found in Chinese gardens. They fuse Chinese traditional painting with Western Art; something very close to Jincheng’s experiences of the world and indeed his own memories. Utterly unique, the stones are rendered in Chinese ink with Chinese brushes and explore new ways of looking at art and sharing cultural heritages.

These are truly beautiful, almost painful works of art and show Jincheng on fine form and creatively vibrant as ever.

Categories: Art

© 2012, XY Collective, London


XY COLLECTIVE
©2012